41

‘Decrease in Human Beings Will Cover Cost of Contraception Mandate,’ Claims Sebelius

Yesterday at a Congressional hearing, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius made two outrageous claims:

From CNSNews.com

During the subcommittee hearing, Rep. Tim Murphy (R-Pa.) said that contraception provided by insurance companies to people employed by religious organizations under the future form of the rule Sebelius described would not be was not free.

“Who pays for it? There’s no such thing as a free service,” Murphy asked.

Sebelius responded that that is not the case with insurance.

“The reduction in the number of pregnancies compensates for cost of contraception,” Sebelius answered.

Murphy expressed surprise by the answer.

“So you are saying, by not having babies born, we are going to save money on health care?” Murphy asked.

Sebelius replied, “Providing contraception is a critical preventive health benefit for women and for their children.”

Murphy again sought clarification.

“Not having babies born is a critical benefit. This is absolutely amazing to me. I yield back,” he said.

Sebelius responded, “Family planning is a critical health benefit in this country, according to the Institute of Medicine.”

Quite aside from the fact that nobody is incensed that the government is now directing private industry to provide goods and services for free, the twin claims that decreasing the population offsets the cost of such mandates to industry, and that contraception is a, “critical preventive health benefit for women and for their children,” tell us all we need to know about the depravity of the political left in this nation.

Lowering cholesterol and salt intake are “critical preventive health benefits” as they prevent disease states such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, etc.

Eliminating tobacco is a “critical preventive health benefit” as it reduces chances of developing lung and throat cancer.

Now we are told by the HHS Secretary that pregnancy is a potential health risk not only to women, but their existing children as well. This is the trajectory the twin evils of abortion and contraception have had us on all along. No less a prophet than Blessed Mother Theresa of Calcutta saw this coming decades ago:

America needs no words from me to see how your decision in Roe v. Wade has deformed a great nation. The so-called right to abortion has pitted mothers against their children and women against men. It has sown violence and discord at the heart of the most intimate human relationships. It has aggravated the derogation of the father’s role in an increasingly fatherless society. It has portrayed the greatest of gifts — a child — as a competitor, an intrusion, and an inconvenience. It has nominally accorded mothers unfettered dominion over the independent lives of their physically dependent sons and daughters

And, in granting this unconscionable power, it has exposed many women to unjust and selfish demands from their husbands or other sexual partners. Human rights are not a privilege conferred by government. They are every human being’s entitlement by virtue of his humanity. The right to life does not depend, and must not be declared to be contingent, on the pleasure of anyone else, not even a parent or a sovereign.

~Mother Theresa — “Notable and Quotable,” Wall Street Journal, 2/25/94, p. A14

While it is axiomatic that families and nations do not grow and prosper by shrinking, the question needs to be asked. What is behind the political left’s emphasis on reducing the size of our population, especially in light of the dwindling numbers of employees who will be available to support retirees on Social Security, Medicaid and Medicare?

It seems to me that the Obama crew has it entirely wrong. The only way to fix the funding shortfalls for senior citizen programs is to increase the size of the nation, her tax-paying workforce, and the size of her economy. Having aborted 54 million citizens over the past 39 years, as well as the offspring they’ll never have, has devastated our senior entitlement programs.

Again, it is axiomatic that growth and prosperity are tied to…

Growth!

There is no logical, economic, political, or philosophical explanation for the model of stewardship espoused by the left. Sebelius has revealed, again, the pitting of the mother against the child of the womb and has now added the pitting of the child of the womb against its siblings. She has reduced pregnancy to the level of a disease state in the Federal system of health management.

It is classic radical feminist agitprop. It also echoes Margaret Sanger who famously decreed,

The most merciful thing that the large family does to one of its infant members is to kill it. The same factors which create the terrible infant mortality rate, and which swell the death rate of children between the ages of one and five, operate even more extensively to lower the health rate of the surviving members. Moreover, the overcrowded homes of large families reared in poverty contribute to this condition. Lack of medical attention is still another factor, so that the child who must struggle for health in competition with other members of a closely packed family has still great difficulties to meet after its poor constitution and malnutrition have been accounted for.

From “Woman and the New Race,” page 63. Book can be read online here.

Such sentiments from two prominent Catholic women arise from the crosscurrents of poorly formed morality and ethics, and encountering human suffering. It would seem that in the Sanger-Sebelius circles not much has changed in 90 years. Their response to suffering and death is not charity and expanding economic opportunity. The response is more death.

It is a cramped worldview that sees human struggle and only envisions death, or nonexistence as the solution. We can do better than these people.

We must.


Dr. Gerard Nadal is Science and Health Education Policy Advisor for the Bioethics Defense Fund. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology with a minor in Philosophy from Saint John's University, New York City. After his post-baccalaureate sciences at Columbia University, New York City,  Dr. Nadal returned to Saint John's University where he received his Master of Science in Cellular and Molecular Biology, Master of Philosophy in Biology, and Ph.D. in Molecular Microbiology. Also a member of University Faculty For Life and the Catholic Writers Guild, Dr. Nadal is a columnist for Headline BistroDr. Nadal also serves on several advisory boards, including the Coalition on Abortion/Breast Cancer, Good Counsel Homes, and the Children First Foundation. A Fourth Degree Knight of Columbus and unapologetic Roman Catholic loyal to the Magisterium, Dr. Nadal and his wife home school their three children. He blogs at Coming Home.


Filed under: »
  • john2000young

    Now our government is a real evil empire.

  • goral

    The ayatollahs do call us the great satan. One has to give that statement some credence. Keep in mind that internationally, we as the U.S. support even more of the things that we as Catholics abhor.
    In addition we actually have catholics promoting these evils.
    I see the scandal and now this issue as the Holy Spirit calling our bishops to arms and getting them
    back on a long neglected track.

  • john2000young

    I wonder how our bishops respond to her messages. Even though it looks hopeless, it is the perfect time to preach and correct and cleans the culture. I don’t see many activities. Where are they, our good Shepard?

    • florin

      For some reason, many of the Bishops seem afraid to rebuke Pelosi and so she becomes more aggressive and more arrogant labeling the Bishops and the Church as ‘anti-woman’. Abortion is never good for the woman, the mother! never! P.John Paul,P.Benedict, Cardinal Burke and others have declared publicly that those ‘Catholic’ politicans who publicly promote the abortion agenda should refrain from receiving Holy Communion…but Pelosi and others do not heed and continue on their path to bring others to their side in opposition to the Church and her teachings. Pelosi is now promoting same sex marriage. Whaat must this woman do to be considered ‘not’ a Catholic in good standing. Take the knife herself to the unborn?! Enough is enough! And by letting her off she is being denied the catalyst for conversion…she tells the public that the Bishops are divided on this issue..and she is right…the Bishops are divided but the Catholic Church’s teaching is not divided – it is clear. Let us pray that the Bishops will stand by the Church and her teachings. If they do not, then why should Pelosi and her anti-life, anti-Church colleagues?

      • If Pelosi took the knife herself, she would do less damage … Words from a position of power have a great snowball effect so that she contributes more to killing, with less effort than the people who actually do the job. Yes, she needs to be formally excommunicated: Is there a bishop out there who is willing?

        • florin

          Pelosi said that the Bishops are divided on this issue and that her own Bishop has never spoken to her about it. Then she added: “because if he had, I would have been devastated.” which means that if her Bishop had spoken to her and had told her she could no longer receive the Eucharist, she might have realized how grave the issue is and could possibly have had a conversion experience. Instead, she declares to all, rightly, that the Bishops are divided on the issue and pursues her anti-life agenda. Of course, if she really wanted to know the Church’s position, she could have checked canon law, or the words of P.John Paul and P. Benedict and Cardinal Burke who is a canon lawyer and Prefect of the Signature, the Vatican’s highest court. There must be a bishop who will have the courage to speak to Pelosi … otherwise, the killing will go on and on and on.

  • BetsyRheaume

    The government will make up the shortfall by denying insurance coverage to senior citizens; fewer children, fewer seniors, problem is solved.

  • florin

    Feb. 3rd: These anti-life agendas are going to become more aggressive and voracious as long as Cathiolic politicians like Pelosi can thumb their noses at the Bishops and declare publicly that Catholics stand with them – against the Church, and that they are right about the issues and the Bishops are wrong. I work intensely in the pro life arena. Do you know what it’s like to have thrown in your face: “It’s not true that the Catholic Church considers abortion a serious issue since Pelosi and Biden and other prominent Catholic politicians say it’s not serious and they are good Catholics since they are permitted to receive Holy Communion.” as long as there are no consequences, the behavior will not change and the person who is the channel of evil will never convert, convinced that he/she is on the right path. Card. George said Catholic hositals will have to close if the mandate remains. Other Bishops have declared their readiness to go to prison. Other Bishops have said they will ‘address’ the issue…the issue has been addressed over and over..it’s time for action. Catholic people and non-Catholics are confused about this; Catholics are dis-heartened. If Pelosi aggressively and publicly proposed a ‘pro-pediphelia’ agenda, would we simply ‘address’ the issue. The enemies of life and of the Church and her teachings are becoming stronger and more emboldened because they know they can. Pelosi mocks the bishops and almost dares them to give her the consequence of being refused the Eucharist until she publicly repents…and so the killing of the unborn babies goes on. It’s time to stop the killing!

  • dante

    Yes, And thank God there are a few righteous places left on earth. With big families and no birth control Haiti is a Catholic paradise. I am so proud of what our Church has done for Haiti.

    • florin

      Actually the Catholic Church has done tremendous work in Haiti for many many years. I worked there as a volunteer for over 14 years, so I know. And I have seen Priests go out to serve their people burning with the fever and chills of malaria and yet, they kept on. The Haitian people, like the African people, do not consider killing their babies the solution to their poverty. Their governments have, for the most part, been utterly corrupt…hopefully, that is changing. Meanwhile, the Church continues to serve there alongside the Haitian people.

      • wild rose

        Offering free contraceptives at every corner for teen girls and women promotes irresponsibility. Offering free contraceptives to every female is an evil way to win a Presidential election.

        • dante

          “Offering free contraceptives at every corner / to every female…” — exaggeration only hurts your cause. No one takes you seriously.
          This health insurance thing only applies to women with good, fulltime jobs.
          And, most American women agree with this ruling; not that it will seriously impact the election — the state of the economy and the ridiculously weak Repub candidates are the two biggest factors.

      • dante

        Florin, thank you and bless you for your service.
        You might consider that the use of birth control, not infanticide, has improved people’s lives in many places.
        You know what they say about doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.

  • Tarheel

    I ask to all those Catholics that voted for Obama, “Are you happy now?”

    • dante

      Yes, Mr Tarheel, as far as this issue goes I’m happy I voted for Obama. My Mother died of over-work; I was the oldest of 9. She had 10 pregnancies that I know about. I hold the Bishops and their anti-contraceptive policies responsible for her death. Fewer children would have made all of us happier and more successful, as well as given her a better and longer life.
      I notice Prof. Dr Nadal and his wife have only 3 children. Unless he only got married 3 years ago he’s likely using some kind of contraceptive technique, like every other Catholic family I know.
      As far as every other issue goes, Obama is essentially the third bush / cheney term. I wish there was a virtuous man to vote for, but there is not.

      • florin

        Dante, you say fewer children would have made all of you happier. Which of your siblings would you eliminate in order for you to be happy? I’m sorry your mother suffered from overwork; I hope she found some joy in her children. My Irish grandmother had 7 children and she took in a niece so she had 8 to care for. My grandfather died when he was only 37 years old of pneumonia; so, my grandmother was left with 8 children to care for. She went to work cleaning houses and cooked for all the children; they helped with the cleaning; Salvation Army and the local Parish helped my grandmother, she told us. Then grandma went to Nursing School and got a good job as a Nurse. She never would have wanted less children; they were her joy despite the fact that she had to work so hard for so long for them. Life is hard with or without children. But if we have faith in God and in each other, the help we need will be there. I’m sorry if it wasn’t there for your mother or for you.

        • Mary Kochan

          Florin, I think you are asking Dante the wrong question, although you are close to the truth when you ask, “Which of your siblings would you eliminate in order for you to be happy?” I think a more pertinent question is this:

          Dante do you agree with God that you are lovable? God loves you and He wants you to love yourself. Do you love yourself?

          To love yourself means that you must view your own existence as a good gift.

          Once you have come to agreement with God on that, then you can begin to obey the command to love your neighbor as YOURSELF. That is to say that if you recognize the goodness of your own life, you must recognize the goodness of other’s lives. Their existence should be, not an occasion of grumbling from you and wishing that they weren’t here, but an occasion of thankfulness to God for them. If your mother was faithful and if she did indeed pour herself out in sacrificial love for her family, then she will be rewarded in glory. She would desire nothing more at this point than that you and all your siblings so live that you will join her in eternity. Please make that your focus because you words betray that you have succumbed to a very narrow perspective that this life is all there is. IT IS NOT!

          • florin

            Beautiful response Mary. Thank you.

          • dante

            Clearly there’s plenty of straw where you all live, judging by the number of straw dantes being built here.
            I never wished any of my siblings didn’t exist; I helped take care of them. I love them all. And you all know that and sin against me by suggesting otherwise.
            And, my Mother had more children than was good for her. Yes, she loved us all, and all twenty-something grandchildren.
            Yes, Mary, you’re correct; I don’t always feel gratitude for my life.
            I just can’t buy the ‘crown in Heaven’ argument though. It’s just way too manipulative and childish.

          • Mary Kochan

            But, Dante, the logical conclusion to you saying that your mother had more children than was good for her, is to say that your mother and the rest of your family would be better off without someone. Since we understand, as Catholics, that God intends every person who is created, then we cannot accept that conclusion. If we cannot accept that conclusion, then we have to back up and take a look at the underpinnings of the logic you are using to see where it has gone off track.

            The “crown in Heaven argument” as you call it is only manipulative IF it is NOT TRUE. If it is true, it is not only NOT manipulative, but it is the most important thing of all. And anything that is raised against it, so that people forget the eternal values is the REAL MANIPULATION AND DECEIT. Do you think that this life is all there is? Or do you think that human beings are eternal beings? Do you think that of all the things that parents can acquire, the most valuable things of all are children because they are eternal?

            But perhaps more to the point, Dante, do you understand that you are an eternal being whose life is intended by God? You, unique and unrepeatable, are personally loved by the Creator of the universe. You have an eternal future of which this life is merely the “womb”. Just like a mother’s womb is place from which a baby is born into this life, this life is the place from which we are born into eternal life.

            That does not mean this life is not valuable and worthwhile, but it does mean that we have to have an eternal perspective when we are judging the sufferings we undergo in this life. From what you say, your mother underwent certain sufferings in the course of giving birth and raising a number of children. If you look at this life as closed in on itself, there is no good reason for a mother to put herself out like that. She should put her own needs, health, desires, and welfare ahead of everything. But looked at from an eternal perspective, it is very different. Suffering is salvific and redemptive.

            Dante, I don’t know if you are a practicing Catholic. But I do know that this faith can give you insights into the true value of things that will change your attitude and give you great comfort and joy and make you grateful every day God gave you the gift of life.

  • Tarheel

    I’m sorry about your mother. There is plenty I could say but I won’t out of respect for your mother. I’m sure she loved you all dearly.

  • goral

    Dante, your last post has a false premise, a faulty association, a presumptuous conclusion and an unsuportive rationalization.
    In short it displays the mind and heart of a democrat.

    • dante

      I think you mean an ‘unsupported’ rationalization; but thank you for your loving kindness.

  • goral

    Your correction is appropriate but I detect contempt in your gratitude. My earlier comment is pretty straightforward taking you to task on the pathetic accusation in your post.
    Which one of your brothers or sisters would you consign to the care of Dr. Kevorkian so that your life would be better?
    There is no outside remedy for bitterness.
    It’s all on the inside.

  • My Grandma had nine children, including my Mom, and every single one of them (including the one who didn’t turn out very well) has a place in our family. Six of them were born with a rare blood disorder and would have died shortly after birth without transfusions.

    I am an only child who always wished for brothers and sisters. Children are ALWAYS a gift from God. 99% of our social problems are caused by broken-down families, which are in turn caused by Man deciding for himself who is to live and who is to die, or who is to be contracepted entirely out of existence.

    Speaking of doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result – isn’t that exactly what we have with contraception? Our families are destroyed, our children are dying by the millions under the abortionist’s knife, civil society is collapsing – and all we’re told is that we need more birth control, more abortion, more sex ed in schools.

    We need to immediately STOP what we know to be destroying our civilization and get back on the path to God. If there is an earthly solution at all any more to the mess we’re in, that’s a big part of it.

  • goral

    Spot on, PrairieHawk, we continue to do the same thing except more efficiently. Efficiency costs, they need more money. No executioner works for nothing, although a lot of them do get their added goodies when death happens.
    Sebelius and Dante and Ms. Fluke are all cheerleaders for the Barak Hussein death squads.

  • dante

    Bless you goral; May you find peace, and the roots of peace.

  • florin

    Goral, I don’t believe at all that Dante is a cheerleader for Obama’s ‘death squads’ – he is speaking of his pain because of his mother’s being overworked. Dante, I don’t believe anyone is intending to be ‘manipulative or childish’…and you really can’t know that your mother had more children than were good for her. Who can say what is good for another? Unless your mother spoke to you in despair at having had too many children. Did each of you help your mother around the house and in other ways? You say you did…and I’m sure you were a big help. When people respond to your post, please try to believe that most do so out of kindness and concern for you.

    • dante

      Thank you for taking the time to answer me, Florin.
      Re: manipulative / childish; I was referring to Mary’s reference: “…then she will be rewarded in glory”, or, as my mother used to joke: ‘more jewels in her crown in heaven’.
      Personally, I think that’s just a way to manipulate the faithful. But that’s just me.

      “Unless my mother spoke to me in despair…”, I read the book she had on rhythm. I don’t remember how old I was.
      I was close to my mom; she got a scholarship to college and had to quit after a year when I came along. I know how she felt. I was the first of our family to graduate college.
      “Did each of you help…”, lol, as much as you might think 8 boys and one girl would help. I might add that we all, including my Mom, were running a family commercial greenhouse at the time. My Dad had to get a job outside the family business as it wasn’t generating enough money. We all worked plenty hard. And hard work and faith hasn’t been enough.
      I know all responses are out of kindness, thank you. I hope you take my comments as well meaning exploration.

      • florin

        Dante, I am so touched by your love and reverence for your mother. How proud she must be of you. We were poor when I was a child. There were 6 of us. I remember my mother coming to my high school in a beautiful, but threadbare, coat. She sacrificed so much for us, as did my father, and to me, she radiated love and beauty and goodness. I wasn’t aware, of course, of her sacrifices for a long time. I heard my parents talking about bills that needed to be paid but there wasn’t enough money. I asked my mother why she hadn’t let us kids know about all this and she said she wanted us to enjoy our childhood and tht she felt children shouldn’t be burdened with such things. Despite not have a lot, there was so much joy, so many good memories of family picnics and barbecues – of celebrating St. Patrick’s day with Irish songs and Irish soda bread and, Dante, I am sure from what you say about your mother, that you too have memories of happy times…cherish those. I don’t believe your mother would want you to grieve forever over the sacrifices she made because she loved you and your siblings so much. Listening to you, I have a sense that you gave your mother a lot of joy and happiness. Hold onto that…and share it when you can. As Mary said, though it is difficult to understand, if this is all there is, then we would have no chance of deep happiness and joy because we would be so immersed in suffering and fear that we would become paralyzed within and unable to experience even a ray of light or a movement of joy…what impressed me most throughout all my years of working among the poor in Haiti was there joy, their generosity in sharing the little they had with those who had less…and their absolute confidence in God and in His care for them. That’s a hard one, I know…but what we understand as ‘care’ is a bit different, I think, then what God considers deep and everlasting care. it doesn’t make it any easier…we want to protect those we love from ever suffering, but we can’t and we shouldn’t because suffering, in a real sense, forms us, hones us…especially when united with the sufferings of Christ. Strangely, the poor understand this and this is what enables them to keep going, and to share what little they have with those who have less. I wish you peace, Dante…

        • dante

          Thank you, Florin, for your kind words. It sounds like we had similar upbringings, except that my family is German Catholic.)
          My wife is the great-grand-daughter of Irish /fleeing the British/, I mean, immigrants seeking a better life.
          Peace to you too, brother.

          • florin

            Dante, you say your mother joked about ‘more jewels in her crown in heaven’ – I have to tell you she sounds like my Irish grandmother. The way you speak of your mother, she seems to have had a great sense of humor. Perhaps, Dante, she had more joy in her heart and in her life that you realized. Sometimes, you know, our hearts are hidden. I’m glad you’re here Dante…hang in there. God doesn’t mean for us to have miserable lives; though we struggle to get through the darkess at times, when the clouds do finally break, the light that comes through is more radiant and more beautiful because of the darkness and pain we have known. It was hard working among the poor in Haiti and in Calcutta with Mother Teresa. Often I was close to despair but something always happened…a great storm in Haiti where mud huts with straw roofs were utterly destroyed. But as soon as the storm passed, rainbows appeared in the sky and the people came out smiling and singing, glad to be alive, glad to have weathered the storm. They taught me so much – so much! They gave, they shared when they had barely enough for themselves. When I was a child and we had very little during the early years, my grandparents always came bearing gifts of new shoes, new clothes…and toys. The gifts were great but the best of all was to have so many family members always there for us…and so I grew up knowing a call to return the gift – to be there for others, especially those who have no one…peace to you Dante…

  • dante

    Replying to Mary:
    Thank you for your care and concern, Mary

    “But, Dante, the logical conclusion to you saying that your mother had more children than was good for her, is to say that your mother and the rest of your family would be better off without someone.”

    No, I don’t believe that is the logical conclusion.
    Some*one* would not have been born to my parents.
    They would have been born to another set of parents, presumably.

    “Since we understand, as Catholics, that God intends every person who is created, then we cannot accept that conclusion. If we cannot accept that conclusion…”

    Please explain why God intended my parents’ generation to have 9, 10, 12 kids? Why was the burden on them? My wife’s mother had 12, I believe, three who were born severely retarded and were institutionalized as her mother couldn’t handle them, raise the rest and fulfill her role as an Iowa farm-wife. That God is such a great guy!

    “The “crown in Heaven argument” as you call it is only manipulative IF it is NOT TRUE. If it is true, it is not only NOT manipulative, but it is the most important thing of all.”

    Still don’t buy it; it’s just a justification for the suffering of the laity.

    “Do you think that this life is all there is?”

    No.

    “Do you think that of all the things that parents can acquire, the most valuable things of all are children because they are eternal?”

    ‘Acquire’? Do you really mean to use that word?
    And no, I think the development of our own holiness is the most valuable.

    “But perhaps more to the point, Dante, do you understand that you are an eternal being whose life is intended by God? You, unique and unrepeatable, are personally loved by the Creator of the universe.”

    Meh, ‘personally loved’? no thanks, I just don’t get this anthropologising of ‘god’. But that’s just me! No need to attack! Hearing children sing ‘Jesus wuvs me, yes he does’ makes me a little ill.

    “You have an eternal future of which this life is merely the “womb”. … this life is the place from which we are born into eternal life.”

    Yes, the old afterlife swindle, I’ve heard it and don’t believe it.

    “… Suffering is salvific and redemptive.”

    Yes, but only for some, certainly for a lot of people suffering is destructive and anything but redemptive. Do you deny this?

    “Dante, I don’t know if you are a practicing Catholic.”

    No, I’m not. I have too many issues with the Church.

    “But I do know that this faith can give you insights into the true value of things that will change your attitude and give you great comfort and joy and make you grateful every day God gave you the gift of life.”

    I’m very happy you have found comfort and joy in your faith, Mary. Catholicism has not given me insights into the true value of things… and I went to Catholic gs, hs, and a year and a half of rc college.

    If I were to characterize my life I would say I value truth over comfort. I live a fairly spiritual life and have attained some measure of something or another.

    • Have you ever thought of taking up the challenge of this life instead of just ducking it? Try this:

      1. God is good and all-powerful.
      2. Suffering happens anyway.
      3. Therefore, God must permit suffering for some good reason.

      Instead of rejecting God because things happen that you don’t like, why not enter into a relationship with Him and see if you can understand better why things happen? None of us will get all the answers, at least in this life, but I bet you $1 that you’ll achieve greater peace and even a measure of happiness. You don’t sound like a very happy person.

      • dante

        Thank you, PH,
        I don’t think you know me well enough to judge if I’m happy, very happy, or not.
        If you’re familiar with Myers-Briggs, I’m INTP. Reading about the different types of human character may help you to understand people.
        May you be happy too! or, if you are already, may your skill in communication increase.

    • Mary Kochan

      “No, I don’t believe that is the logical conclusion.
      Some*one* would not have been born to my parents.
      They would have been born to another set of parents, presumably.”

      Oh, come on. You can’t believe that if you weren’t born to your parents, YOU could have been born to other parents. You are you with all the traits you have inherited from your parents and you are you because of all the traits you inherited from your parents. Human beings are not interchangeable like this. Any person not conceived simply does not exist and never comes to exist. You don’t even need faith to understand that, just common sense and elementary science.

      “Please explain why God intended my parents’ generation to have 9, 10, 12 kids? Why was the burden on them? My wife’s mother had 12, I believe, three who were born severely retarded and were institutionalized as her mother couldn’t handle them, raise the rest and fulfill her role as an Iowa farm-wife. That God is such a great guy!”

      Oh, good grief. God intends for every marriage to be open to life — that is the whole purpose of it. But couples can use their prudential judgement to limit the size of the families if they need to. People used to value children economically, though, when the culture was more agricultural. Here’s a news flash for you: most people don’t merely feel that their kids are a “burden” — rather alongwitht he burdensome aspect of parenting, they experience a lot of joy.

      And have you ever known any retarded people. I have. And guess what? They happen to value and enjoy their lives. Who are you to decide they have no right to be here. It is sad that your grandmother could not care for all her children, but I’ll bet she loved them all.

      Boy, do you ever need the Christian faith. I’m sorry that somehow it was not transmitted to you during Catholic school. That is very sad.

      • dante

        “Boy, do you ever need the Christian faith. I’m sorry that somehow it was not transmitted to you during Catholic school. That is very sad.”

        I’m 61, a boy no longer; as for sadness, I realize you are speaking only for yourself, as you wouldn’t presume to speak for me.

        As for the retarded people, that was my mother-in-law.

        Thank you

  • HomeschoolNfpDad

    Actually to presume that a sibling not born to one’s parents, would necessarily be born to another set of parents, is illogical. The Church teaches that we are, as human beings, a unity of body and soul. “Hear O Israel,” says Jesus in the Gospel. “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and all your mind and all your soul and all your strength.” Good words when identifying the nature of the greatest commandment. But God commands each of us to love Him with all that we are. Jesus, in this phrase, enumerates us.

    Each human consists of heart and mind and soul and strength, meaning body. Each human is a union of these essential elements. Each human is a unique union of these essential elements. Destroy one of these elements, and you have killed the person. Heart refers to the emotional sense that is part of each one of us. Modern medicine can identify the muscle, but nothing in modern medicine can physically touch a feeling because feelings have no material nature. Modern medicine can identify the grey matter in between our ears, but nothing in modern medicine can touch a thought. Not even the most advanced neuroscience can do more than creep up upon the faintest echoes of thoughts and feelings, if you really attempt to understand what the Church has to say about these two essential elements. And of course, modern medicine cannot even get at the echoes of a hint of the human soul. Too often, it dismisses the soul’s existence.

    The only thing that any of us can touch is the body — and yet this body is an essential element of who each one of us is. In a very real sense, I am my body because my body is the only natural element of humanity that can be detected with the senses. Emotions, thoughts, and spirituality are expressed in and through the body. Divorce those notions, thoughts and spirituality from a particular body — meaning one which inherits its own physical uniqueness from a particular set of parents — and you no longer have a person. You merely have a thought, perhaps a sigh, maybe less.

    The body is the sacrament of the person. A particular person’s body is inherited from his mother and father (or in the case of Jesus, from his mother alone). It is that particular body which God infuses with a human soul, making thoughts and feelings possible. Remove that particular body, and the person whose being it sacramentally would express, does not exist.

    There is no hypothetical pool of souls floating around in the great beyond from which God chooses to infuse life into a particular body. We are created beings who exist body and soul together — or not. Why this is so is a mystery, but God tells us in the Scripture and through His Church that it is so. God chooses fallible humans to be his co-creators, not his meat repositories, and he creates a unique, unrepeatable human soul at the moment of conception — or He does not.

    That God allows us such a prominent role in His acts of creation ought to send us trembling to our knees. Minimally, though it demands our respect and intellectual honesty. We can argue something different, but we cannot argue that the Truth says something different. We can only accept the Truth and seek to understand, as best we can, or we can seek to understand first — and then shoehorn it into the Truth as best we may. The Church always lauds the former. But what most people don’t really realize is that the Church is always sympathetic to the latter, even when She recognizes — as she does — that She must correct such misunderstandings. And even condemn them if they become widespread.

    Truth has to come first. Only then can any argument be logical.

    • dante

      Thank you HNFPDad,for taking the time to address me. I have to admit my eyes kind of glazed over reading your post.) My fault!

  • dante

    I apparently didn’t make clear that I don’t need to be fixed; I don’t. I’m no sadder than I need to be.
    Thank you all for your efforts to lead me to the light.
    Tom

  • goral

    God is not Yakov Bok, The Fixer, he’s the Creator and Redeemer.

    “God chooses fallible humans to be his co-creators, not his meat repositories, and he creates a unique, unrepeatable human soul at the moment of conception — or He does not.” NfpDad

    This is nothing to “glaze over”, it’s a most profound truth given to us by Mother Church, a mother you have rejected, Dante, because you’re hanging on resentfully to your biological mother. That’s all of us to some degree.

    May you also find the peace that you wish upon me. The root of that peace is respect for the life that God gives us, all life, at every stage.
    That’s the solution, as this article asserts.
    It’s pride that wants to manipulate life.
    It’s pride that diminishes life based upon our preferences.
    It’s pride that wants to pass off as compassion an unnatural attachment to that which gives us comfort and the opportunity to pass judgement.

    As stated, we all struggle at some level with these attachments and that pride.
    God is not going to overhaul us, as some Protestant theology posits.
    He conquered and already redeemed every broken soul that mysteriously finds within its being the
    longing to belong to Him.