Columnists

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
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The Feast of Sts. Peter & Paul

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“Self” Magazine is certainly a sign of the times. This is an age when it is socially acceptable to admit that life is all about me. But selfishness is nothing new. Ever since Eve bit into the apple, human beings have made the choice to dethrone God and put in His place the unholy trinity […]

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
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The Eucharist: The Body of Christ?

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The Catholic Church teaches the doctrine of transubstantiation, namely, that in the Eucharist, the communion wafer and the altar wine are transformed and really become the body and blood of Jesus Christ. Have you ever met anyone who has found this Catholic doctrine to be a bit hard to take? If so, you shouldn’t be […]

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
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Trinity Sunday: Is it Relevant?

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Many are ready to give a polite nod of some sort to Jesus of Nazareth. Most honor him as a great moral teacher. Many even confess him as Savior. But the Incarnation of the Eternal God? Second person of the Holy Trinity? God can’t be one and three at the same time. Such a notion […]

Jake Frost
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A Tale of Five Kings for Father’s Day

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My poor Dad. He made a ton of money his whole life. But he never had any. Instead, he had kids. Lots of them. Of course, when I was younger I never considered things from the perspective of my parents. The good things they gave us, as far as I could tell, were like the […]

Marge Fenelon
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How God Conquered My Fears in the Holy Land

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While I was in the Holy Land, many Scripture verses surfaced in my mind and heart as I stood in the places of the Old and New Testaments. But, the one I found myself recalling most often was Psalm 91: For you have made the LORD, my refuge,             Even the Most High, your dwelling place.      No […]

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
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Why The Ascension Matters

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The celebration of the Ascension used to leave me a bit flat.  It was clear what Good Friday did for me.  And Easter Sunday’s benefits were indisputable.  But as for the Ascension, what’s in it for me? Christianity is about a kind of love we call agape or charity.  It is love that looks away […]

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
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The Paraclete

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He wore steel rimmed glasses and had hair to the middle of his back.  The fringe on his buck-skinned jacket bounced as he walked. At least that was the way I was accustomed to seeing Mike as he bopped around town.  It was just a few years after Woodstock, and we were all taken with […]

Jake Frost
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Book Review: Something Other Than God

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I have a bone to pick with Jennifer Fulwiler:  she kept me up late for about week reading her book, Something Other Than God. And we’ve got four kids aged five and under, so sleep is at a high premium around here. I wasn’t planning on reading Something Other Than God at all right now.  […]

Marge Fenelon
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What Does Pope Francis’ Visit to the Holy Land Have to do With Us?

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It may seem as though Pope Francis’ trip to the Holy Land May 24-26 is something far away, both mentally and geographically. Trust me, it’s very close. Sure, he’ll be meeting with a number of dignitaries from positions and areas that don’t directly affect us. But, the main purpose for his trip is to meet […]

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
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Jesus is the Way, the Truth, and the Life

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“As long as you believe in God and try to be a good person, your religion doesn’t matter.”  “There are different paths up the same mountain, but they all lead to the peak.” How many times have you heard people speak this way?  This is the prevailing wisdom.  It’s politically correct.  Tolerant.  Reasonable. But it’s […]

Jake Frost
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The Cereal Box Principle

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What’s the most widely read literature of the 20th century?  According to an informal, non-scientific poll (consisting of me and Mom, who happened to be talking about this on the phone), it’s not Pride and Prejudice, or The Lord of the Rings—it’s the cereal box. Now, obviously that’s not because packaging prose is particularly powerful.  […]

Rev. Tucker Cordani
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Paul in Arabia: Saul, Stephen, and the Temple

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The Temple authorities cracked down on the Nazoreans.  Peter and the Apostles were rounded up and brought before the Sanhedrin, the Jewish Supreme Court.  The majority of its members favored a drastic sentence.  It was the influential Gamaliel, a teacher of the law, respected by all the people, who took the initiative of securing their […]

Jake Frost
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The Great Alleluia!

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A few days before Easter our clan would gather around the dining room table, cover it with newspapers, and get dirty. Or rather:  colorful. Lots of little fingers got stained purple, pink and green while dipping hard boiled eggs into cups of die. The more artistically inclined among us would draw crayon designs on their […]

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
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The Victory of the Cross

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Terrorism is nothing new.  It’s probably as old as the human race.  In fact the cradle of civilization, now Iraq, was the home of the most infamous terrorists of antiquity, the Assyrians.  Their goal was to conquer their neighbors in a way that would minimize  initial resistance and subsequent rebellion.  To do this, they knew […]

Rev. Tucker Cordani
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A Priest Reflects on the Chrism Mass

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The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me, to bring glad tidings to the poor. —Is 61:1-2; cf Lk4:18 HOLY THURSDAY, APRIL 17, AD 2014, Cathedral of Saint Mary, Diocese of Lansing, Michigan.  I, a priest of Christ Jesus by the will of God, was in attendance with many of […]

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
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The Victory of Humility

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When a conquering hero of the ancient world rode into town in triumph, it was in a regal chariot or on the back of a stately stallion.  Legions of soldiers accompanied him in the victory procession.  Triumphal arches, festooned with relief sculptures, were often erected to immortalize his valiant victory. After driving out demons, healing […]

Rev. Tucker Cordani
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St. Paul in Arabia: The Apostles Preaches in Damascus

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In ancient times the city of Damascus employed a system of subterranean canals that irrigated the plains and supplied Damascenes with drinking water.  Some of these aqueducts were more than a mile in length.  It was through these canals that Saint Paul escaped the city to enter Arabia (Gal 1:17), and through them he returned […]

Ebeth Weidner
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Faith and a New Way of Thinking

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Have faith. But when you are at the lowest of your moods, how do you have faith?  Where does that ability to have faith come from? Presently I am reading a book about being happy despite your circumstances.  Being happy doesn’t fix the problems and concerns of daily life, happiness doesn’t even pay the bills […]

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
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Lazarus

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Some find it hard to accept that God would love some people more than others. That wouldn’t be fair, they say. But God became man. If he did not love some more than others, Jesus wouldn’t be fully human. For human beings have family and friends. While we can do good and even risk our […]

Rev. Tucker Cordani
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St. Paul in Arabia: Between the Dark and Light

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A great light enveloped Saul of Tarsus, the zealous Pharisee and persecutor of the Church.  Blinded by the light, he fell to the ground and heard a voice call him twice by name.  “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?”“Who are you Lord?”  Saul asked.  The reply came, “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting.”  […]

Jake Frost
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Marker Mayhem With Little Kids

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It was a rainy, inside day, so I went to the craft boxes to see what I might find.  Cereal boxes—perfect!  I generally try to save cereal boxes for just such occasions when you find yourself unexpectedly confined indoors—you can do a million different projects with those things—and today, with some markers and scissors, construction […]

E. L. Core
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Always Earth Hour

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Earth Hour: dumbest idea ever?

Fr. Frank Pavone
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The Pope, the President, and the Right to Life

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Pope Francis and President Obama met in Rome today, and the meeting has naturally generated commentary, both before and after the fact, including by the President himself at the National Prayer Breakfast last month. I am confident that the meeting itself will bear good fruit. I am not so confident that the commentary about it […]

Rev. Tucker Cordani
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Paul and Moses at the Shore of the Red Sea

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There is certain work of Christian literature written c. AD 190 that tells the story of how Saint Paul baptized a lion.  By the power of God Paul tamed the animal, baptized him by immersion, and claimed the creature for Christ.            “I, Paul, en route to Jericho, accompanied by two pious women, was confronted by […]

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